Closing the Deal

I’ve never owned a house of my own. However, in the near future, I hope my situation is going to change. For the past 10 years, I’ve been saving money to buy a home. Thankfully, I almost have enough cash saved up to make a sizable down payment on a new house. Because this transaction will be my first real estate purchase, I know I will need the help of a reputable real estate attorney. This professional can examine all of the documents relating to my home purchase. When I close the deal on my home purchase, I want my real estate attorney to be by my side advising me. On this blog, you will discover the benefits of hiring a real estate lawyer when purchasing a new home.

Steps To Take When Selling A House You Inherited: Tips For You

When you are in a situation in which you have inherited property or a home that you are not interested in keeping or moving into, you may wonder what you can and should do to properly sell the inheritance you received. This can be a somewhat complicated situation to deal with. However, if you take the proper steps, you can quickly get your inherited home on the market and sold as smoothly as possible. Get to know some of the steps that you should take so that you can get the process started. Go Through The House Thoroughly Before you put the house you inherited from a loved one on the market, you will want to go through the house and perform a thorough walk-through. This walk-through serves a few purposes for you. First, you will be able to determine if any of your loved one’s possessions were left behind in the house. Secondly and more importantly, you can walk through the house to get an idea of the exact condition it is in. By getting an up-close view of the house, you can decide whether or not you want to have any repairs done before you try to sell the house. Hire a Real Estate Attorney Because the transfer of the house deed to your name through your inheritance as well as the subsequent sale of the house can be tricky, it would be a good idea for you to hire a real estate attorney to help you with all of the ins and outs of the process. The real estate attorney will be able to handle the...

Your Residential Lease Agreement Is Binding, But It Might Not Cover Everything

Renting often comes with a residential lease agreement between you and the property owner. Many people aren’t sure just how binding that lease agreement really is. Many also aren’t sure what constitutes breaking the lease when the language of the lease is non-specific.  A Residential Lease Agreement Is Legally Binding A lease agreement is a contract, and like any other signed contract it becomes legally binding. However, your lease cannot contain language that specifically goes against your jurisdiction’s landlord-tenant act. This is important to understand, because if there’s a dispute, you will have the upper hand if the lease contains such language. Understand that your lease is only subject to your jurisdiction’s law. Don’t assume that things that worked in another jurisdiction will work in the one that you’re in. Landlord-tenant law varies by state, so always make sure that you familiarize yourself with your state’s particular version of these laws before pressing any grievances. A Residential Lease Agreement Might Not Cover Everything Remember that your residential lease is binding for both you and the property owner. That means that your landlord cannot suddenly make changes or demand things of you that directly go against what’s stated on the lease. There is a gray area of rental leases. If the lease doesn’t have any language regarding a specific situation, then it can become difficult to figure out what to do about it. For example, your lease says absolutely nothing about pets. So, you move in with your dog. A month down the line, your landlord says pets are not allowed on the property. He or she may further give...

Five Ways Lost Wages Are Calculated In A Personal Injury Claim

If you have been injured through no fault of your own, you may be seeking to be compensated for your injuries. You may be eligible to receive compensation for your medical expenses, personal property losses, vehicle loss or damage, and lost wages. You may be wondering about how your lost wages will be compensated, since you are concerned about all the work you have been missing. Read on for more information about how lost wages are calculated for personal injury claims. 1.  You are eligible for reimbursement for all the time you missed work as a result of the accident. You should include all time spent getting medical treatment and tests, and all follow-up appointments related to your injuries, including physical therapy and mental health counseling. Time spent recuperating at home is also covered. 2.  Begin keeping a record of all time away from work with exact dates and times, including your commute time to appointments. You will need proof of each occurrence of missed work, such as medical records or doctors notes, so keep your paperwork organized. 3.  You are entitled to lost wages whether you are full-time, part-time, self-employed, hourly or salary. To prove lost wages you should have: Hourly and part-time: Pay stubs (several if you work varied hours so that an average can be determined). Salary: Pay stub and/or a letter from human resources stating your salary and work hours. Self-employed: Tax returns for past two years and/or bank statements for past few months. If you are providing your income tax return for proof of income earned, you need only provide the page of your...

Real Estate 101: Five Reasons You Might Need A Lawyer

The real estate market is booming. Buying, selling, and inheriting: there are plenty of opportunities to see homes and make big decisions. Although it may seem like a very easy task, (buying, selling, or inheriting) it is usually more difficult than anticipated. Real estate agents can provide a lot of help to the newcomers in the real estate market; however, they can only do so much and are often unaware of the laws surrounding real estate. This is where a residential real estate attorney comes in handy. So when might you need the help of a residential real estate lawyer? Here are five of the most common scenarios: Agreement Analysis: A real estate attorney is helpful for analyzing and reviewing purchase agreements. If there are specific obligations, exceptions, or requirements the attorney can inform you and the realtor about them. He or she can also help you understand lengthy and complicated paperwork. Additionally, a lawyer can help you to defend your rights should the purchase fall through or if a lien discovery is made. Foreclosures: Buying a short sale or foreclosed home can save you a lot of money. Sadly, these deals are often complicated. Even worse, they are quick and require immediate attention. A real estate agent can help you find and purchase the home, but a lawyer can help you with the legalities of purchasing the home. On the other hand, a lawyer can help if you are under foreclosure by minimizing the impact it has on your credit score. Inheritance: Another way a real estate lawyer can help is with inheritances. If you inherit a piece...

Precedent For The Decedent: Important Terminology In Probate Courses

Probate courts are a unique branch of law with centuries of precedents governing how cases are handled. When you wade into the murky waters of legal terminology, you stand little to no chance of navigating your case effectively and efficiently. Many legal words have their roots in Latin and Greek. While you likely learned some Latin and Greek roots in school, you will be unequipped to handle the terminology of a probate case on your own. Even with a lawyer who is well versed in probate diction by your side to guide you, it can still be helpful to have an understanding of a few key terms.  Probate Court When the will writer dies, the will in question should be taken to court to be verified. The court convened to test and prove the authenticity of will documents is known as probate court. The term probate comes from a Latin word meaning to prove; thus, the whole purpose of the probate court is to test the authenticity of a will.  The Decedent Rather than refer to the writer of a will as the will writer, probate lawyers and court officials will likely refer to the deceased as either the deceased or the decedent. Decedent is simply a noun created from the same language family as deceased and refers to someone who is no longer living.  The Executor When a person rights a will, they have to choose someone they trust to carry out the terms of the will after they die. This person is known as the executor and is charged with faithfully executing the terms of the will....